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Seen today at Sarphatipark

”Ever since I was a little girl I wanted to be a dancer. From a very young age I had it planned out but all of that changed two years ago. They told me my feet did not meet the requirements of a professional dancer and that I had to quit the dance academy. I remember I cried for days, it literally broke my heart.”
”How did you get over that?”
”I don’t think I ever did.”

”In my group of friends I´m the one keeping all the secrets.”

She was ready to be photographed but then looked at her grandfather and decided he wasn’t. And when grandpa has a bad hair day, it has to be fixed right away.


”This feels familiair.”
”Have you been modelling?”
”Not really but I was one of those two-year-old who played in a pamper commercial. That was a pretty good gig though. It paid for my way through college.”

”What was the saddest day of your life?”
”The day I went back to Colombia and realized my traveling had changed me too much to ever fit back in again.”

That’s all I needed to cheer up my day..

”When I was 16 years old she decided to relive her youth. My dad wasn’t around so I had to take care of my two younger sisters. At some point the situation got out of hand and I left the house. For years I wandered from one place to another without anywhere to go. When my ex-girlfriend got pregnant it was the first time I found peace within myself. All of a sudden my goals were very clear. I changed everything about my life that was unstable. When we broke up we agreed that our issues would never be a burden to our son. I would never want him to go through same shit I went through as a little boy.”

When I asked her if I could take her photograph she agreed. Every shot I took she somehow looked away or tried to hide her face from me. I asked her if she felt uncomfortable in front of the camera, she answered: ”I have been modeling in the past for quite a while. Being photographed reminds me of the fashion world. I’ve seen it up close and believe me it isn’t pretty. But your blog probably has nothing to do with that so I’ll try my best.”

”I travel the world making jewelry. Each country inspires me in a different way.”

”Are you a musician?”
”I’m trying to be..”
”Do you play music in the conservatory?”
”I play music in life..”

* And then he shared his orange with me.

”Twenty-three years ago I came to Amsterdam as a refugee from Burkina Faso. I didn’t know anyone and I barely had any money. For three months I slept outside in the Sarphatipark without any place to go. It was summer so luckily it wasn’t too cold but neither did I had much expectations after leaving my homeland behind. Back home I was an actor so after a while I got involved in the acting scene of Amsterdam. Soon I understood that acting wasn’t going to make enough money to provide for a living. I decided to go back to school and get a degree in finance and now I am working in a bank.”
”What is the most important lesson you have learned from your journey?”
”To let life carry you instead of trying to carry life itself, it’s to heavy anyways.”

”I was raised Christian but I converted to Hare Krishna years ago. When I told my family I wanted to convert they were happy for me, even my brother who is a pastor gave me his blessing. The beautiful thing is that even though I converted, we still believe in the same god.”

”My name is Kesavi Dasi. It means servant of the female energy of god.”

”I love to make art such as textile sculptures and paintings. Unfortunately the leukemia makes me really tired so I don´t get to be creative as often as I would like to. Seventeen years have passed and I have learned to deal with it. A lot of people tell me they admire my strength and optimism. They just don´t know that once the guest leave my house, I´m completely worn out.”